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Author Lagos, N.A.; Benitez, S.; Duarte, C.; Lardies, M.A.; Broitman, B.R.; Tapia, C.; Tapia, P.; Widdicombe, S.; Vargas, C.A. pdf  doi
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  Title Effects of temperature and ocean acidification on shell characteristics of Argopecten purpuratus: implications for scallop aquaculture in an upwelling-influenced area Type
  Year 2016 Publication (up) Aquaculture Environment Interactions Abbreviated Journal Aquac. Environ. Interact.  
  Volume 8 Issue Pages 357-370  
  Keywords Calcification; Shell growth; Scallop farming; Upwelling; Chile  
  Abstract Coastal upwelling regions already constitute hot spots of ocean acidification as naturally acidified waters are brought to the surface. This effect could be exacerbated by ocean acidification and warming, both caused by rising concentrations of atmospheric CO2. Along the Chilean coast, upwelling supports highly productive fisheries and aquaculture activities. However, during recent years, there has been a documented decline in the national production of the native scallop Argopecten purpuratus. We assessed the combined effects of temperature and pCO(2)-driven ocean acidification on the growth rates and shell characteristics of this species farmed under the natural influence of upwelling waters occurring in northern Chile (30 degrees S, Tongoy Bay). The experimental scenario representing current conditions (14 degrees C, pH similar to 8.0) were typical of natural values recorded in Tongoy Bay, whilst conditions representing the low pH scenario were typical of an adjacent upwelling area (pH similar to 7.6). Shell thickness, weight, and biomass were reduced under low pH (pH similar to 7.7) and increased temperature (18 degrees C) conditions. At ambient temperature (14 degrees C) and low pH, scallops showed increased shell dissolution and low growth rates. However, elevated temperatures ameliorated the impacts of low pH, as evidenced by growth rates in both pH treatments at the higher temperature treatment that were not significantly different from the control treatment. The impact of low pH at current temperature on scallop growth suggests that the upwelling could increase the time required for scallops to reach marketable size. Mortality of farmed scallops is discussed in relation to our observations of multiple environmental stressors in this upwelling-influenced area.  
  Address [Lagos, Nelson A.; Benitez, Samanta] Univ Santo Tomas, Fac Ciencias, Ctr Invest & Innovac Cambio Climat, Santiago 8370003, Chile, Email: nlagoss@santotomas.cl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Inter-Research Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1869-215x ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000377605600030 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 630  
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Author Benitez, S.; Duarte, C.; Opitz, T.; Lagos, N.A.; Pulgar, J.M.; Vargas, C.A.; Lardies, M.A. pdf  doi
openurl 
  Title Intertidal pool fish Girella laevifrons (Kyphosidae) shown strong physiological homeostasis but shy personality: The cost of living in hypercapnic habitats Type
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Marine Pollution Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Mar. Pollut. Bull.  
  Volume 118 Issue 1-2 Pages 57-63  
  Keywords Carbon dioxide; Hypercapnic conditions; Physiology; Behavior; Intertidal pool; Fish  
  Abstract Tide pools habitats are naturally exposed to a high degree of environmental variability. The consequences of living in these extreme habitats are not well established. In particular, little it is known about of the effects of hypercanic seawater (i.e. high pCO(2) levels) on marine vertebrates such as intertidal pool fish. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increased pCO(2) on the physiology and behavior in juveniles of the intertidal pool fish Girella laevifrons. Two nominal pCO(2) concentrations (400 and 1600 patm) were used. We found that exposure to hypercapnic conditions did not affect oxygen consumption and absorption efficiency. However, the lateralization and boldness behavior was significantly disrupted in high pCO(2) conditions. In general, a predator-risk cost of boldness is assumed, thus the increased occurrence of shy personality in juvenile fishes may result in a change in the balance of this biological interaction, with significant ecological consequences. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
  Address [Benitez, S.; Lagos, N. A.] Univ Santo Tomos, Fac Ciencias, Ctr Invest & Innovat Cambia Climat CiiCC, Santiago, Chile, Email: cristian.duarte@unab.cl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0025-326x ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000402217300020 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 737  
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Author Lagos, N.A.; Benitez, S.; Grenier, C.; Rodriguez-Navarro, A.B.; Garcia-Herrera, C.; Abarca-Ortega, A.; Vivanco, J.F.; Benjumeda, I.; Vargas, C.A.; Duarte, C.; Lardies, M.A. doi  openurl
  Title Plasticity in organic composition maintains biomechanical performance in shells of juvenile scallops exposed to altered temperature and pH conditions Type
  Year 2021 Publication (up) Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci. Rep.  
  Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 24201  
  Keywords OCEAN ACIDIFICATION; ELEVATED-TEMPERATURE; COMPENSATORY MECHANISM; SEAWATER ACIDIFICATION; CLIMATE-CHANGE; IMPACTS; BIOMINERALIZATION; RESPONSES; MUSSELS; INTENSIFICATION  
  Abstract The exposure to environmental variations in pH and temperature has proven impacts on benthic ectotherms calcifiers, as evidenced by tradeoffs between physiological processes. However, how these stressors affect structure and functionality of mollusk shells has received less attention. Episodic events of upwelling of deep cold and low pH waters are well documented in eastern boundary systems and may be stressful to mollusks, impairing both physiological and biomechanical performance. These events are projected to become more intense, and extensive in time with ongoing global warming. In this study, we evaluate the independent and interactive effects of temperature and pH on the biomineral and biomechanical properties of Argopecten purpuratus scallop shells. Total organic matter in the shell mineral increased under reduced pH (similar to 7.7) and control conditions (pH similar to 8.0). The periostracum layer coating the outer shell surface showed increased protein content under low pH conditions but decreasing sulfate and polysaccharides content. Reduced pH negatively impacts shell density and increases the disorder in the orientation of calcite crystals. At elevated temperatures (18 degrees C), shell microhardness increased. Other biomechanical properties were not affected by pH/temperature treatments. Thus, under a reduction of 0.3 pH units and low temperature, the response of A. purpuratus was a tradeoff among organic compounds (biopolymer plasticity), density, and crystal organization (mineral plasticity) to maintain shell biomechanical performance, while increased temperature ameliorated the impacts on shell hardness. Biopolymer plasticity was associated with ecophysiological performance, indicating that, under the influence of natural fluctuations in pH and temperature, energetic constraints might be critical in modulating the long-term sustainability of this compensatory mechanism.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000731322900005 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ alexi.delcanto @ Serial 1522  
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