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Author Canessa, E.; Chaigneau, S.; Barra, C.
Title Developing and calibrating an ABM of the property listing task Type
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings de la 32nd European Council for Modelling and Simulation, ECMS 2018 Abbreviated Journal ECMS 2018
Volume 2018 Issue Pages 13-19
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2522-2414 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved
Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 1290
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Author Chaigneau, S.E.; Canessa, E.; Lenci, A.; Devereux, B.
Title Eliciting semantic properties: methods and applications Type
Year 2020 Publication Cognitive Processing Abbreviated Journal Cogn. Process.
Volume 21 Issue 4 Pages 583-586
Keywords
Abstract Asking subjects to list semantic properties for concepts is essential for predicting performance in several linguistic and non-linguistic tasks and for creating carefully controlled stimuli for experiments. The property elicitation task and the ensuing norms are widely used across the field, to investigate the organization of semantic memory and design computational models thereof. The contributions of the current Special Topic discuss several core issues concerning how semantic property norms are constructed and how they may be used for research aiming at understanding cognitive processing.
Address [Chaigneau, Sergio E.; Canessa, Enrique] Univ Adolfo Ibanez, Ctr Cognit Res CINCO, Avda Presidente Errazuriz, Santiago 3328, Chile, Email: sergio.chaigneau@uai.cl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Heidelberg Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1612-4782 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes WOS:000577853600001 Approved
Call Number UAI @ alexi.delcanto @ Serial 1233
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Author Canessa, E.; Chaigneau, S.E.; Lagos, R.; Medina, F.A.
Title How to carry out conceptual properties norming studies as parameter estimation studies: Lessons from ecology Type
Year 2021 Publication Behavior Research Methods Abbreviated Journal Behav. Res. Methods
Volume Early Access Issue Pages 17 pp
Keywords Conceptual properties norming studies; Property listing task; Parameter estimation; Sample size determination; Sample coverage
Abstract Conceptual properties norming studies (CPNs) ask participants to produce properties that describe concepts. From that data, different metrics may be computed (e.g., semantic richness, similarity measures), which are then used in studying concepts and as a source of carefully controlled stimuli for experimentation. Notwithstanding those metrics' demonstrated usefulness, researchers have customarily overlooked that they are only point estimates of the true unknown population values, and therefore, only rough approximations. Thus, though research based on CPN data may produce reliable results, those results are likely to be general and coarse-grained. In contrast, we suggest viewing CPNs as parameter estimation procedures, where researchers obtain only estimates of the unknown population parameters. Thus, more specific and fine-grained analyses must consider those parameters' variability. To this end, we introduce a probabilistic model from the field of ecology. Its related statistical expressions can be applied to compute estimates of CPNs' parameters and their corresponding variances. Furthermore, those expressions can be used to guide the sampling process. The traditional practice in CPN studies is to use the same number of participants across concepts, intuitively believing that practice will render the computed metrics comparable across concepts and CPNs. In contrast, the current work shows why an equal number of participants per concept is generally not desirable. Using CPN data, we show how to use the equations and discuss how they may allow more reasonable analyses and comparisons of parameter values among different concepts in a CPN, and across different CPNs.
Address [Canessa, Enrique; Chaigneau, Sergio E.] Univ Adolfo Ibanez, Sch Psychol, Ctr Cognit Res CINCO, Av Presidente Errazuriz 3328, Santiago, Chile, Email: ecanessa@uai.cl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1554-351x ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes WOS:000551760700002 Approved
Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 1210
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Author Canessa, E.; Chaigneau, S.E.
Title Mathematical regularities of data from the property listing task Type
Year 2020 Publication Journal Of Mathematical Psychology Abbreviated Journal J. Math. Psychol.
Volume 97 Issue Pages 19 pp
Keywords Concepts; Property listing task; Conceptual properties norms; Semantic access
Abstract To study linguistically coded concepts, researchers often resort to the Property Listing Task (PLT). In a PLT, participants are asked to list properties that describe a concept (e.g., for DOG, subjects may list “is a pet”, “has four legs”, etc.), which are then coded into property types (i.e., superficially dissimilar properties such as “has four legs” and “is a quadruped” may be coded as “four legs”). When the PLT is done for many concepts, researchers obtain Conceptual Properties Norms (CPNs), which are used to study semantic content and as a source of control variables. Though the PLT and CPNs are widely used across psychology, there is a lack of a formal model of the PLT, which would provide better analysis tools. Particularly, nobody has attempted analyzing the PLT's listing process. Thus, in the current work we develop a mathematical description of the PLT. Our analyses indicate that several regularities should be found in the observable data obtained from a PLT. Using data from three different CPNs (from 3 countries and 2 different languages), we show that these regularities do in fact exist and generalize well across different CPNs. Overall, our results suggest that the description of the regularities found in PLT data may be fruitfully used in the study of concepts. (C) 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Address [Canessa, Enrique; Chaigneau, Sergio E.] Univ Adolfo Ibanez, Ctr Cognit Res CINCO, Sch Psychol, Av Presidente Errazuriz 3328, Santiago, Chile, Email: ecanessa@uai.cl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Academic Press Inc Elsevier Science Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-2496 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes WOS:000539438000007 Approved
Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 1192
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Author Canessa, E.; Chaigneau, S.E.; Moreno, S.; Lagos, R.
Title Informational content of cosine and other similarities calculated from high-dimensional Conceptual Property Norm data Type
Year 2020 Publication Cognitive Processing Abbreviated Journal Cogn. Process.
Volume 21 Issue Pages 601-614
Keywords Cosine similarity; Euclidean distance; Chebyshev distance; Clustering; Conceptual properties
Abstract To study concepts that are coded in language, researchers often collect lists of conceptual properties produced by human subjects. From these data, different measures can be computed. In particular, inter-concept similarity is an important variable used in experimental studies. Among possible similarity measures, the cosine of conceptual property frequency vectors seems to be a de facto standard. However, there is a lack of comparative studies that test the merit of different similarity measures when computed from property frequency data. The current work compares four different similarity measures (cosine, correlation, Euclidean and Chebyshev) and five different types of data structures. To that end, we compared the informational content (i.e., entropy) delivered by each of those 4 x 5 = 20 combinations, and used a clustering procedure as a concrete example of how informational content affects statistical analyses. Our results lead us to conclude that similarity measures computed from lower-dimensional data fare better than those calculated from higher-dimensional data, and suggest that researchers should be more aware of data sparseness and dimensionality, and their consequences for statistical analyses.
Address [Canessa, Enrique; Chaigneau, Sergio E.] Univ Adolfo Ibanez, Sch Psychol, Ctr Cognit Res CINCO, Ave Presidente Errazuriz 3328, Santiago, Chile, Email: ecanessa@uai.cl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Heidelberg Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1612-4782 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes WOS:000546845700001 Approved
Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 1180
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Author Lagos, R.; Canessa, E.; Chaigneau, S.E.
Title Modeling stereotypes and negative self-stereotypes as a function of interactions among groups with power asymmetries Type
Year 2019 Publication Journal For The Theory Of Social Behaviour Abbreviated Journal J. Theory Soc. Behav.
Volume 49 Issue 3 Pages 312-333
Keywords negative self-; stereotypes; agent based simulation; social power; stereotypes
Abstract Stereotypes is one of the most researched topics in social psychology. Within this context, negative self-stereotypes pose a particular challenge for theories. In the current work, we propose a model that suggests that negative self-stereotypes can theoretically be accounted for by the need to communicate in a social system made up by groups with unequal power. Because our theory is dynamic, probabilistic, and interactionist, we use a computational simulation technique to show that the proposed model is able to reproduce the phenomenon of interest, to provide novel accounts of related phenomena, and to suggest novel empirical predictions. We describe our computational model, our variables' dynamic behavior and interactions, and link our analyses to the literature on stereotypes and self-stereotypes, the stability of stereotypes (in particular, gender and racial stereotypes), the effects of power asymmetries, and the effects of intergroup contact.
Address [Lagos, Rodrigo] Univ Chile, Programa Magister Bioestadist, Santiago, Chile, Email: sergio.chaigneau@uai.cl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-8308 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes WOS:000483671300004 Approved
Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 1049
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Author Chaigneau, S.E.; Canessa, E.; Barra, C.; Lagos, R.
Title The role of variability in the property listing task Type
Year 2018 Publication Behavior Research Methods Abbreviated Journal Behav. Res. Methods
Volume 50 Issue 3 Pages 972-988
Keywords Property listing task; Conceptual property norms; Inter-subject variability; Conceptual agreement theory
Abstract It is generally believed that concepts can be characterized by their properties (or features). When investigating concepts encoded in language, researchers often ask subjects to produce lists of properties that describe them (i.e., the Property Listing Task, PLT). These lists are accumulated to produce Conceptual Property Norms (CPNs). CPNs contain frequency distributions of properties for individual concepts. It is widely believed that these distributions represent the underlying semantic structure of those concepts. Here, instead of focusing on the underlying semantic structure, we aim at characterizing the PLT. An often disregarded aspect of the PLT is that individuals show intersubject variability (i.e., they produce only partially overlapping lists). In our study we use a mathematical analysis of this intersubject variability to guide our inquiry. To this end, we resort to a set of publicly available norms that contain information about the specific properties that were informed at the individual subject level. Our results suggest that when an individual is performing the PLT, he or she generates a list of properties that is a mixture of general and distinctive properties, such that there is a non-linear tendency to produce more general than distinctive properties. Furthermore, the low generality properties are precisely those that tend not to be repeated across lists, accounting in this manner for part of the intersubject variability. In consequence, any manipulation that may affect the mixture of general and distinctive properties in lists is bound to change intersubject variability. We discuss why these results are important for researchers using the PLT.
Address [Chaigneau, Sergio E.; Canessa, Enrique] Univ Adolfo Ibanez, Sch Psychol, Ctr Cognit Res CINCO, Av Presidente Errazuriz 3328, Santiago, Chile, Email: sergio.chaigneau@uai.cl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1554-351x ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes WOS:000434639400008 Approved
Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 876
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Author Canessa, E.; Chaigneau, S.
Title Response surface methodology for estimating missing values in a pareto genetic algorithm used in parameter design Type
Year 2017 Publication Ingenieria E Investigacion Abbreviated Journal Ing. Invest.
Volume 37 Issue 2 Pages 89-98
Keywords Robust design; parameter design; pareto genetic algorithm; response surface methodology
Abstract We present an improved Pareto Genetic Algorithm (PGA), which finds solutions to problems of robust design in multi-response systems with 4 responses and as many as 10 control and 5 noise factors. Because some response values might not have been obtained in the robust design experiment and are needed in the search process, the PGA uses Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to estimate them. Not only the PGA delivered solutions that adequately adjusted the response means to their target values, and with low variability, but also found more Pareto efficient solutions than a previous version of the PGA. This improvement makes it easier to find solutions that meet the trade-off among variance reduction, mean adjustment and economic considerations. Furthermore, RSM allows estimating outputs' means and variances in highly non-linear systems, making the new PGA appropriate for such systems.
Address [Canessa, Enrique] Univ Adolfo Ibanez, Fac Ingn & Ciencias, Santiago, Chile, Email: ecanessa@uai.cl;
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Univ Nac Colombia, Fac Ingenieria Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0120-5609 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes WOS:000408441100012 Approved
Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 760
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Author Chaigneau, S.E.; Puebla, G.; Canessa, E.C.
Title Why the designer's intended function is central for proper function assignment and artifact conceptualization: Essentialist and normative accounts Type
Year 2016 Publication Developmental Review Abbreviated Journal Dev. Rev.
Volume 41 Issue Pages 38-50
Keywords Artifacts; Function; Design; Essentialism; Ownership
Abstract People tend to think that the function intended by an artifact's designer is its real or proper function. Relatedly, people tend to classify artifacts according to their designer's intended function (DIF), as opposed to an alternative opportunistic function. This centrality of DIF has been shown in children from 6 years of age to adults, and it is not restricted to Western societies. We review four different explanations for the centrality of DIF, integrating developmental and adult data. Two of these explanations are essentialist accounts (causal and intentional essentialism). Two of them are normative accounts (conventional function and idea ownership). Though essentialist accounts have been very influential, we review evidence that shows their limitations. Normative accounts have been less predominant. We review evidence to support them, and discuss how they account for the data. In particular, we review evidence suggesting that the centrality of DIF can be explained as a case of idea ownership. This theory makes sense of a great deal of the existing data on the subject, reconciles contradictory results, links this line of work to other literatures, and offers an account of the observed developmental trend. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Address [Chaigneau, Sergio E.] Adolfo Ibanez Univ, Sch Psychol, Ctr Social & Cognit Neurosci, Ctr Cognit Res, Santiago, Region Metropol, Chile, Email: sergio.chaigneau@uai.cl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Academic Press Inc Elsevier Science Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0273-2297 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes WOS:000381845200002 Approved
Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 648
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Author Canessa, E.C.; Chaigneau, S.E.
Title When are concepts comparable across minds? Type
Year 2016 Publication Quality & Quantity Abbreviated Journal Qual. Quant.
Volume 50 Issue 3 Pages 1367-1384
Keywords Conceptual Agreement Theory; Conceptual variability; Shared meaning; Agreement
Abstract In communication, people cannot resort to direct reference (e.g., pointing) when using diffuse concepts like democracy. Given that concepts reside in individuals' minds, how can people share those concepts? We argue that concepts are comparable across a social group if they afford agreement for those who use it; and that agreement occurs whenever individuals receive evidence that others conceptualize a given situation similarly to them. Based on Conceptual Agreement Theory, we show how to compute an agreement probability based on the sets of properties belonging to concepts. If that probability is sufficiently high, this shows that concepts afford an adequate level of agreement, and one may say that concepts are comparable across individuals' minds. In contrast to other approaches, our method considers that inter-individual variability in naturally occurring conceptual content exists and is a fact that must be taken into account, whereas other theories treat variability as error that should be cancelled out. Given that conceptual variability will exist, our approach may establish whether concepts are comparable across individuals' minds more soundly than previous methods.
Address [Canessa, Enrique Carlos] Univ Adolfo Ibanez, Fac Ingn & Ciencias, Av P Hurtado 750, Vina Del Mar, Chile, Email: ecanessa@uai.cl;
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0033-5177 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes WOS:000374458900025 Approved
Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 614
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Author Canessa, E.; Chaigneau, S.
Title Calibrating Agent-Based Models Using a Genetic Algorithm Type
Year 2015 Publication Studies In Informatics And Control Abbreviated Journal Stud. Inform. Control
Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 79-90
Keywords Agent-based modelling; genetic algorithms; calibration; validation; relational equivalence; complex adaptive systems
Abstract We present a Genetic Algorithm (GA)-based tool that calibrates Agent-based Models (ABMs). The GA searches through a user-defined set of input parameters of an ABM, delivering values for those parameters so that the output time series of an ABM may match the real system's time series to certain precision. Once that set of possible values has been available, then a domain expert can select among them, the ones that better make sense from a practical point of view and match the explanation of the phenomenon under study. In developing the GA, we have had three main goals in mind. First, the GA should be easily used by non-expert computer users and allow the seamless integration of the GA with different ABMs. Secondly, the GA should achieve a relatively short convergence time, so that it may be practical to apply it to many situations, even if the corresponding ABMs exhibit complex dynamics. Thirdly, the GA should use a few data points of the real system's time series and even so, achieve a sufficiently good match with the ABM's time series to attaining relational equivalence between the real system under study and the ABM that models it. That feature is important since social science longitudinal studies commonly use few data points. The results show that all of those goals have been accomplished.
Address [Canessa, Enrique] Univ Adolfo Ibanez, CINCO, Fac Ingn & Ciencias, Vina Del Mar, Chile, Email: ecanessa@uai.cl;
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Natl Inst R&D Informatics-Ici Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1220-1766 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes WOS:000351892900009 Approved
Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 481
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Author Canessa, E.; Chaigneau, S.
Title The dynamics of social agreement according to Conceptual Agreement Theory Type
Year 2014 Publication Quality & Quantity Abbreviated Journal Qual. Quant.
Volume 48 Issue 6 Pages 3289-3309
Keywords Conceptual Agreement Theory; Agent-based modeling; Conceptual diversity; Dynamics of conceptual development
Abstract Many social phenomena can be viewed as processes in which individuals in social groups develop agreement (e.g., public opinion, the spreading of rumor, the formation of social and linguistic conventions). Conceptual Agreement Theory (CAT) models social agreement as a simplified communicational event in which an Observer and Actor exchange ideas about a concept , and where uses that information to infer whether 's conceptual state is the same as its own (i.e., to infer agreement). Agreement may be true (when infers that is thinking and this is in fact the case, event ) or illusory (when infers that is thinking and this is not the case, event ). In CAT, concepts that afford or become more salient in the minds of members of social groups. Results from an agent-based model (ABM) and probabilistic model that implement CAT show that, as our conceptual analyses suggested would be the case, the simulated social system selects concepts according to their usefulness to agents in promoting agreement among them (Experiment 1). Furthermore, the ABM exhibits more complex dynamics where similar minded agents cluster and are able to retain useful concepts even when a different group of agents discards them (Experiment 2). We discuss the relevance of CAT and the current findings for analyzing different social communication events, and suggest ways in which CAT could be put to empirical test.
Address [Canessa, Enrique] Univ Adolfo Ibanez, Fac Ingn & Ciencias, Vina Del Mar, Chile, Email: ecanessa@uai.cl;
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0033-5177 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes WOS:000343294900024 Approved
Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 418
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Author Chaigneau, S.E.; Canessa, E.; Gaete, J.
Title Conceptual agreement theory Type
Year 2012 Publication New Ideas In Psychology Abbreviated Journal New Ideas Psychol.
Volume 30 Issue 2 Pages 179-189
Keywords Reference; Shared reference; Meaning; Agreement; Joint action
Abstract For some time now, psychological inquiry on reference has assumed that reference is achieved through causal links between words and entities (i.e., direct reference). In this view, meaning is not relevant for reference or co-reference. We argue that this view may be germane to concrete objects, but not to diffuse objects (that lack clear spatio-temporal limits, thus preventing the use of direct reference in interactions). Here, we propose that meaning is the relevant dimension when referring to diffuse entities, and introduce Conceptual Agreement Theory (CAT). CAT is a mathematized theory of meaning that specifies the conditions under which two individuals (or one individual at two points in time) will infer they share a diffuse referent. We present the theory, and use stereotype stability and public opinion as case studies to illustrate the theory's use and scope. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Address [Chaigneau, Sergio E.; Gaete, Joaquin] Univ Adolfo Ibanez, Escuela Psicol, Santiago, Chile, Email: sergio.chaigneau@uai.cl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0732-118x ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes WOS:000302333200003 Approved
Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 206
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