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Author Altimiras, F.; Garcia, J.A.; Palacios-Garcia, I.; Hurley, M.J.; Deacon, R.; Gonzalez, B.; Cogram, P. doi  openurl
  Title Altered Gut Microbiota in a Fragile X Syndrome Mouse Model Type
  Year 2021 Publication Frontiers in Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Front. Neurosci.  
  Volume 15 Issue Pages 653120  
  Keywords AKKERMANSIA-MUCINIPHILA; BRAIN; AUTISM; METABOLISM; ECOLOGY; HEALTH; BOWEL  
  Abstract The human gut microbiome is the ecosystem of microorganisms that live in the human digestive system. Several studies have related gut microbiome variants to metabolic, immune and nervous system disorders. Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder considered the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability and the leading monogenetic cause of autism. The role of the gut microbiome in FXS remains largely unexplored. Here, we report the results of a gut microbiome analysis using a FXS mouse model and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. We identified alterations in the fmr1 KO2 gut microbiome associated with different bacterial species, including those in the genera Akkermansia, Sutterella, Allobaculum, Bifidobacterium, Odoribacter, Turicibacter, Flexispira, Bacteroides, and Oscillospira. Several gut bacterial metabolic pathways were significantly altered in fmr1 KO2 mice, including menaquinone degradation, catechol degradation, vitamin B6 biosynthesis, fatty acid biosynthesis, and nucleotide metabolism. Several of these metabolic pathways, including catechol degradation, nucleotide metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, were previously reported to be altered in children and adults with autism. The present study reports a potential association of the gut microbiome with FXS, thereby opening new possibilities for exploring reliable treatments and non-invasive biomarkers.  
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  ISSN 1662-453X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000659516900001 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ alexi.delcanto @ Serial 1415  
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Author Besaury, L.; Ouddane, B.; Pavissich, J.P.; Dubrulle-Brunaud, C.; Gonzalez, B.; Quillet, L. pdf  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact of copper on the abundance and diversity of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in two chilean marine sediments Type
  Year 2012 Publication Marine Pollution Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Mar. Pollut. Bull.  
  Volume 64 Issue 10 Pages 2135-2145  
  Keywords Marine sediment; Copper contamination; Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes; Real-time PCR; DGGE; Phylogenetic analysis  
  Abstract We studied the abundance and diversity of the sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) in two 30-cm marine chilean sediment cores, one with a long-term exposure to copper-mining residues, the other being a non-exposed reference sediment. The abundance of SRPs was quantified by qPCR of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene beta-subunit (dsrB) and showed that SRPs are sensitive to high copper concentrations, as the mean number of SRPs all along the contaminated sediment was two orders of magnitude lower than in the reference sediment. SRP diversity was analyzed by using the dsrB-sequences-based PCR-DGGE method and constructing gene libraries for dsrB-sequences. Surprisingly, the diversity was comparable in both sediments, with dsrB sequences belonging to Desulfobacteraceae, Syntrophobacteraceae, and Desulfobulbaceae, SRP families previously described in marine sediments, and to a deep branching dsrAB lineage. The hypothesis of the presence of horizontal transfer of copper resistance genes in the microbial population of the polluted sediment is discussed. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
  Address [Besaury, Ludovic; Quillet, Laurent] Univ Rouen, Lab Univ MEBE Microbiol Environm & Biol Evolut, F-76821 Mont St Aignan, France, Email: ludovic.besaury@etu.univ-rouen.fr;  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0025-326x ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000310929500032 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 254  
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Author Clavero-Leon, C.; Ruiz, D.; Cillero, J.; Orlando, J.; Gonzalez, B. doi  openurl
  Title The multi metal-resistant bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 affects growth and metal mobilization in Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to copper Type
  Year 2021 Publication PeerJ Abbreviated Journal PeerJ  
  Volume 9 Issue Pages e11373  
  Keywords SOIL; PHYTOEXTRACTION; COLONIZATION; ACCUMULATION; BIOSORPTION; HOMEOSTASIS; MICROBES; CADMIUM; SYSTEMS; EXCESS  
  Abstract Copper (Cu) is important for plant growth, but high concentrations can lead to detrimental effects such as primary root length inhibition, vegetative tissue chlorosis, and even plant death. The interaction between plant-soil microbiota and roots can potentially affect metal mobility and availability, and, therefore, overall plant metal concentration. Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 is a multi metal-resistant bacterial model that alters metal mobility and bioavailability through ion pumping, metal complexation, and reduction processes. The interactions between strain CH34 and plants may affect the growth, metal uptake, and translocation of Arabidopsis thaliana plants that are exposed to or not exposed to Cu. In this study, we looked also at the specific gene expression changes in C. metallidurans when co-cultured with Cu-exposed A. thaliana. We found that A. thaliana's rosette area, primary and secondary root growth, and dry weight were affected by strain CH34, and that beneficial or detrimental effects depended on Cu concentration. An increase in some plant growth parameters was observed at copper concentrations lower than 50 mM and significant detrimental effects were found at concentrations higher than 50 mM Cu. We also observed up to a 90% increase and 60% decrease in metal accumulation and mobilization in inoculated A. thaliana. In turn, copper-stressed A. thaliana altered C. metallidurans colonization, and cop genes that encoded copper resistance in strain CH34 were induced by the combination of A. thaliana and Cu. These results reveal the complexity of the plant-bacteria-metal triad and will contribute to our understanding of their applications in plant growth promotion, protection, and phytoremediation strategies.  
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  ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000651763400003 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ alexi.delcanto @ Serial 1392  
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Author Crutchik, D.; Rodriguez-Valdecantos, G.; Bustos, G.; Bravo, J.; Gonzalez, B.; Pabon-Pereira, C. doi  openurl
  Title Vermiproductivity, maturation and microbiological changes derived from the use of liquid anaerobic digestate during the vermicomposting of market waste Type
  Year 2020 Publication Water Science and Technology Abbreviated Journal Water Sci. Technol.  
  Volume 82 Issue 9 Pages 1781-1794  
  Keywords anaerobic digestion; digestate; market waste; microbial community; residues valorization; vermicomposting  
  Abstract Recently, it has been suggested that the liquid fraction of anaerobic digestate, derived from the treatment of wastewater and solid wastes, could be used in vermicomposting as a solution to its disposal, and even for its valorization. Nevertheless, the literature does not provide enough information about its impact on the process of vermicomposting itself and on the final quality of the end-product. In this study, the effect of different doses of digestate in the vermicomposting process treating market waste is assessed measuring earthworm population dynamics, the bacterial community succession present in the vermibeds, as well as maturation and the end-quality of the vermicompost. Our results show that the addition of liquid digestate to the vermibeds increased the earthworms biomass, i.e. 71%, 94% and 168% in control, and vermibeds with 30% and 60% digestate, respectively. Further, the increase in the amount of N in the vermicompost decreased as the digestate addition increased, i.e. 75%, 8%, 3%. The maturity achieved was high in all treatments as shown by the C/N ratio, 7.98, 7.40 and 10.20, and the high seed germination rate, above 90%. Finally, the succession of the microbial community was not disturbed and compositional stabilization was reached after 92 days.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0273-1223 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ alexi.delcanto @ WOS:000595253000005 Serial 1285  
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Author Crutchik, D.; Rodriguez-Valdecantos, G.; Bustos, G.; Bravo, J.; Gonzalez, B.; Pabon-Pereira, C. doi  openurl
  Title WATER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Type
  Year 2020 Publication Abbreviated Journal Water Sci. Technol.  
  Volume 82 Issue 9 Pages 1781-1794  
  Keywords anaerobic digestion; digestate; market waste; microbial community; residues valorization; vermicomposting  
  Abstract Recently, it has been suggested that the liquid fraction of anaerobic digestate, derived from the treatment of wastewater and solid wastes, could be used in vermicomposting as a solution to its disposal, and even for its valorization. Nevertheless, the literature does not provide enough information about its impact on the process of vermicomposting itself and on the final quality of the end-product. In this study, the effect of different doses of digestate in the vermicomposting process treating market waste is assessed measuring earthworm population dynamics, the bacterial community succession present in the vermibeds, as well as maturation and the end-quality of the vermicompost. Our results show that the addition of liquid digestate to the vermibeds increased the earthworms biomass, i.e. 71%, 94% and 168% in control, and vermibeds with 30% and 60% digestate, respectively. Further, the increase in the amount of N in the vermicompost decreased as the digestate addition increased, i.e. 75%, 8%, 3%. The maturity achieved was high in all treatments as shown by the C/N ratio, 7.98, 7.40 and 10.20, and the high seed germination rate, above 90%. Finally, the succession of the microbial community was not disturbed and compositional stabilization was reached after 92 days.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0273-1223 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ alexi.delcanto @ Serial 1278  
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Author De la Iglesia, R.; Valenzuela-Heredia, D.; Andrade, S.; Correa, J.; Gonzalez, B. pdf  doi
openurl 
  Title Composition dynamics of epilithic intertidal bacterial communities exposed to high copper levels Type
  Year 2012 Publication Fems Microbiology Ecology Abbreviated Journal FEMS Microbiol. Ecol.  
  Volume 79 Issue 3 Pages 720-727  
  Keywords copA; copper; epilithic bacteria; intertidal rocky shore; T-RFLP  
  Abstract Copper has a dual role for organisms, both as micronutrient and toxic element. Copper mining activities have an enormous ecological impact because of the extraction process and the consequent release of copper-containing waste materials to the environment. In northern Chile, mainly in the Chanaral coastal area, this phenomenon is clearly evident. The released waste material has caused a strong modification of the area, and copper enrichment of beaches and rocky shores has provoked a decrease in the richness and diversity of many species of macroorganisms. However, the effects that copper enrichment has on microbial (e.g. bacterial epilithic) communities associated with the rocky shore environment are poorly understood. Using a culture-independent molecular approach, field sampling and laboratory microcosm experiments, we determined the effects of copper enrichment on bacterial communities inhabiting the rocky shore environment. Field samples showed a strong effect of copper on the structure of the natural bacterial epilithic communities, and microcosm experiments demonstrated rapid changes in bacterial community when copper is added, and reversibility of this effect within 48 h after copper is removed.  
  Address [Gonzalez, Bernardo] Univ Adolfo Ibanez, Fac Ingn & Ciencias, Santiago 7941169, Chile, Email: bernardo.gonzalez@uai.cl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0168-6496 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000299257300014 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 192  
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Author De la Iglesia, R.; Valenzuela-Heredia, D.; Pavissich, J.P.; Freyhoffer, S.; Andrade, S.; Correa, J.A.; Gonzalez, B. pdf  doi
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  Title Novel polymerase chain reaction primers for the specific detection of bacterial copper P-type ATPases gene sequences in environmental isolates and metagenomic DNA Type
  Year 2010 Publication Letters In Applied Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Lett. Appl. Microbiol.  
  Volume 50 Issue 6 Pages 552-562  
  Keywords ATPases; bacterial communities; copper resistance; metagenomic DNA; PCR primer pair  
  Abstract Aims: In the last decades, the worldwide increase in copper wastes release by industrial activities like mining has driven environmental metal contents to toxic levels. For this reason, the study of the biological copper-resistance mechanisms in natural environments is important. Therefore, an appropriate molecular tool for the detection and tracking of copper-resistance genes was developed. Methods and Results: In this work, we designed a PCR primer pair to specifically detect copper P-type ATPases gene sequences. These PCR primers were tested in bacterial isolates and metagenomic DNA from intertidal marine environments impacted by copper pollution. As well, T-RFLP fingerprinting of these gene sequences was used to compare the genetic composition of such genes in microbial communities, in normal and copper-polluted coastal environments. New copper P-type ATPases gene sequences were found, and a high degree of change in the genetic composition because of copper exposure was also determined. Conclusions: This PCR based method is useful to track bacterial copper-resistance gene sequences in the environment. Significance and Impact of the Study: This study is the first to report the design and use of a PCR primer pair as a molecular marker to track bacterial copper-resistance determinants, providing an excellent tool for long-term analysis of environmental communities exposed to metal pollution.  
  Address [Gonzalez, B.] Univ Adolfo Ibanez, Fac Ingn & Ciencia, Santiago 7941169, Chile, Email: bernardo.gonzalez@uai.cl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0266-8254 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000277417000002 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 88  
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Author Diaz-Rullo, J.; Rodriguez-Valdecantos, G.; Torres-Rojas, F.; Cid, L.; Vargas, I.T.; Gonzalez, B.; Gonzalez-Pastor, J.E. doi  openurl
  Title Mining for Perchlorate Resistance Genes in Microorganisms From Sediments of a Hypersaline Pond in Atacama Desert, Chile Type
  Year 2021 Publication Frontiers In Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Front. Microbiol.  
  Volume 12 Issue Pages 723874  
  Keywords perchlorate-resistance; oxidative stress; tRNA modification; DNA repair; protein damage; hypersaline environments; Atacama Desert; Mars  
  Abstract Perchlorate is an oxidative pollutant toxic to most of terrestrial life by promoting denaturation of macromolecules, oxidative stress, and DNA damage. However, several microorganisms, especially hyperhalophiles, are able to tolerate high levels of this compound. Furthermore, relatively high quantities of perchlorate salts were detected on the Martian surface, and due to its strong hygroscopicity and its ability to substantially decrease the freezing point of water, perchlorate is thought to increase the availability of liquid brine water in hyper-arid and cold environments, such as the Martian regolith. Therefore, perchlorate has been proposed as a compound worth studying to better understanding the habitability of the Martian surface. In the present work, to study the molecular mechanisms of perchlorate resistance, a functional metagenomic approach was used, and for that, a small-insert library was constructed with DNA isolated from microorganisms exposed to perchlorate in sediments of a hypersaline pond in the Atacama Desert, Chile (Salar de Maricunga), one of the regions with the highest levels of perchlorate on Earth. The metagenomic library was hosted in Escherichia coli DH10B strain and exposed to sodium perchlorate. This technique allowed the identification of nine perchlorate-resistant clones and their environmental DNA fragments were sequenced. A total of seventeen ORFs were predicted, individually cloned, and nine of them increased perchlorate resistance when expressed in E. coli DH10B cells. These genes encoded hypothetical conserved proteins of unknown functions and proteins similar to other not previously reported to be involved in perchlorate resistance that were related to different cellular processes such as RNA processing, tRNA modification, DNA protection and repair, metabolism, and protein degradation. Furthermore, these genes also conferred resistance to UV-radiation, 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (4-NQO) and/or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), other stress conditions that induce oxidative stress, and damage in proteins and nucleic acids. Therefore, the novel genes identified will help us to better understand the molecular strategies of microorganisms to survive in the presence of perchlorate and may be used in Mars exploration for creating perchlorate-resistance strains interesting for developing Bioregenerative Life Support Systems (BLSS) based on in situ resource utilization (ISRU).  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1664-302X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000681631900001 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ alexi.delcanto @ Serial 1456  
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Author Donoso, R.; Leiva-Novoa, P.; Zuniga, A.; Timmermann, T.; Recabarren-Gajardo, G.; Gonzalez, B. pdf  doi
openurl 
  Title Biochemical and Genetic Bases of Indole-3-Acetic Acid (Auxin Phytohormone) Degradation by the Plant-Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Paraburkholderia phytofirmans PsJN Type
  Year 2017 Publication Applied And Environmental Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Appl. Environ. Microbiol.  
  Volume 83 Issue 1 Pages 20 pp  
  Keywords indole-3-acetic acid catabolism; iac genes; Paraburkholderia phytofirmans; plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria  
  Abstract Several bacteria use the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) as a sole carbon and energy source. A cluster of genes (named iac) encoding IAA degradation has been reported in Pseudomonas putida 1290, but the functions of these genes are not completely understood. The plant-growth-promoting rhizobacterium Paraburkholderia phytofirmans PsJN harbors iac gene homologues in its genome, but with a different gene organization and context than those of P. putida 1290. The iac gene functions enable P. phytofirmans to use IAA as a sole carbon and energy source. Employing a heterologous expression system approach, P. phytofirmans iac genes with previously undescribed functions were associated with specific biochemical steps. In addition, two uncharacterized genes, previously unreported in P. putida and found to be related to major facilitator and tautomerase superfamilies, are involved in removal of an IAA metabolite called dioxindole-3-acetate. Similar to the case in strain 1290, IAA degradation proceeds through catechol as intermediate, which is subsequently degraded by ortho-ring cleavage. A putative two-component regulatory system and a LysR-type regulator, which apparently respond to IAA and dioxindole-3-acetate, respectively, are involved in iac gene regulation in P. phytofirmans. These results provide new insights about unknown gene functions and complex regulatory mechanisms in IAA bacterial catabolism. IMPORTANCE This study describes indole-3-acetic acid (auxin phytohormone) degradation in the well-known betaproteobacterium P. phytofirmans PsJN and comprises a complete description of genes, some of them with previously unreported functions, and the general basis of their gene regulation. This work contributes to the understanding of how beneficial bacteria interact with plants, helping them to grow and/or to resist environmental stresses, through a complex set of molecular signals, in this case through degradation of a highly relevant plant hormone.  
  Address [Donoso, Raul; Leiva-Novoa, Pablo; Zuniga, Ana; Timmermann, Tania; Gonzalez, Bernardo] Univ Adolfo Ibanez, Fac Ingn & Ciencias, Santiago, Chile, Email: bernardo.gonzalez@uai.cl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Amer Soc Microbiology Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0099-2240 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000393205400001 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 699  
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Author Donoso, R.A.; Perez-Pantoja, D.; Gonzalez, B. pdf  doi
openurl 
  Title Strict and direct transcriptional repression of the pobA gene by benzoate avoids 4-hydroxybenzoate degradation in the pollutant degrader bacterium Cupriavidus necator JMP134 Type
  Year 2011 Publication Environmental Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Environ. Microbiol.  
  Volume 13 Issue 6 Pages 1590-1600  
  Keywords  
  Abstract As other environmental bacteria, Cupriavidus necator JMP134 uses benzoate as preferred substrate in mixtures with 4-hydroxybenzoate, strongly inhibiting its degradation. The mechanism underlying this hierarchical use was studied. A C. necator benA mutant, defective in the first step of benzoate degradation, is unable to metabolize 4-hydroxybenzoate when benzoate is also included in the medium, indicating that this substrate and not one of its catabolic intermediates is directly triggering repression. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that 4-hydroxybenzoate 3-hydroxylase-encoding pobA transcripts are nearly absent in presence of benzoate and a fusion of pobA promoter to lacZ reporter confirmed that benzoate drastically decreases the transcription of this gene. Expression of pobA driven by a heterologous promoter in C. necator benA mutant, allows growth on 4-hydroxybenzoate in presence of benzoate, overcoming its repressive effect. In contrast with other bacteria, regulators of benzoate catabolism do not participate in repression of 4-hydroxybenzoate degradation. Moreover, the effect of benzoate on pobA promoter can be observed in heterologous strains with the sole presence of PobR, the transcriptional activator of pobA gene, indicating that PobR is enough to fully reproduce the phenomenon. This novel mechanism for benzoate repression is probably mediated by direct action of benzoate over PobR.  
  Address [Donoso, Raul A.; Gonzalez, Bernardo] Univ Adolfo Ibanez, Fac Ingn & Ciencias, Santiago, Chile, Email: bernardo.gonzalez@uai.cl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1462-2912 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000291268900018 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 147  
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Author Donoso, R.A.; Ruiz, D.; Garate-Castro, C.; Villegas, P.; Gonzalez-Pastor, J.E.; de Lorenzo, V.; Gonzalez, B.; Perez-Pantoja, D. doi  openurl
  Title Identification of a self-sufficient cytochrome P450 monooxygenase from Cupriavidus pinatubonensis JMP134 involved in 2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid catabolism, via homogentisate pathway Type
  Year 2021 Publication Microbial Biotechnology Abbreviated Journal Microb. Biotechnol.  
  Volume 14 Issue 5 Pages 1944-1960  
  Keywords COMPLETE GENOME SEQUENCE; ELECTRON-TRANSFER; GENE; DEGRADATION; SYSTEM; STRAIN; P450BM3; GROWTH; DOMAIN; HYDROXYLATION  
  Abstract The self-sufficient cytochrome P450 RhF and its homologues belonging to the CYP116B subfamily have attracted considerable attention due to the potential for biotechnological applications based in their ability to catalyse an array of challenging oxidative reactions without requiring additional protein partners. In this work, we showed for the first time that a CYP116B self-sufficient cytochrome P450 encoded by the ohpA gene harboured by Cupriavidus pinatubonensis JMP134, a beta-proteobacterium model for biodegradative pathways, catalyses the conversion of 2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (2-HPA) into homogentisate. Mutational analysis and HPLC metabolite detection in strain JMP134 showed that 2-HPA is degraded through the well-known homogentisate pathway requiring a 2-HPA 5-hydroxylase activity provided by OhpA, which was additionally supported by heterologous expression and enzyme assays. The ohpA gene belongs to an operon including also ohpT, coding for a substrate-binding subunit of a putative transporter, whose expression is driven by an inducible promoter responsive to 2-HPA in presence of a predicted OhpR transcriptional regulator. OhpA homologues can be found in several genera belonging to Actinobacteria and alpha-, beta- and gamma-proteobacteria lineages indicating a widespread distribution of 2-HPA catabolism via homogentisate route. These results provide first time evidence for the natural function of members of the CYP116B self-sufficient oxygenases and represent a significant input to support novel kinetic and structural studies to develop cytochrome P450-based biocatalytic processes.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1751-7915 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000664134700001 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ alexi.delcanto @ Serial 1426  
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Author Filker, S.; Forster, D.; Weinisch, L.; Mora-Ruiz, M.; Gonzalez, B.; Farias, M.E.; Rossello-Mora, R.; Stoeck, T. pdf  doi
openurl 
  Title Transition boundaries for protistan species turnover in hypersaline waters of different biogeographic regions Type
  Year 2017 Publication Environmental Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Environ. Microbiol.  
  Volume 19 Issue 8 Pages 3186-3200  
  Keywords  
  Abstract The identification of environmental barriers which govern species distribution is a fundamental concern in ecology. Even though salt was previously identified as a major transition boundary for micro- and macroorganisms alike, the salinities causing species turnover in protistan communities are unknown. We investigated 4.5 million high-quality protistan metabarcodes (V4 region of the SSU rDNA) obtained from 24 shallow salt ponds (salinities 4%-44%) from South America and Europe. Statistical analyses of protistan community profiles identified four salinity classes, which strongly selected for different protistan communities: 4-9%, 14-24%, 27-36% and 38-44%. The proportion of organisms unknown to science is highest in the 14-24% salinity class, showing that environments within this salinity range are an unappreciated reservoir of as yet undiscovered organisms. Distinct higher-rank taxon groups dominated in the four salinity classes in terms of diversity. As increasing salinities require different cellular responses to cope with salt, our results suggest that different evolutionary lineages of protists have evolved distinct haloadaptation strategies. Salinity appears to be a stronger selection factor for the structuring of protistan communities than geography. Yet, we find a higher degree of endemism in shallow salt ponds compared with less isolated ecosystems such as the open ocean. Thus, rules for biogeographic structuring of protistan communities are not universal, but depend on the ecosystem under consideration.  
  Address [Filker, Sabine] Univ Kaiserslautern, Dept Mol Ecol, D-67663 Kaiserslautern, Germany, Email: stoeck@rhrk.uni-kl.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1462-2912 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000407790700021 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 761  
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Author Gacitua, M.A.; Gonzalez, B.; Majone, M.; Aulenta, F. pdf  doi
openurl 
  Title Boosting the electrocatalytic activity of Desulfovibrio paquesii biocathodes with magnetite nanoparticles Type
  Year 2014 Publication International Journal Of Hydrogen Energy Abbreviated Journal Int. J. Hydrog. Energy  
  Volume 39 Issue 27 Pages 14540-14545  
  Keywords Microbial biocathode; Magnetite nanoparticles; Hydrogen generation; Microbial electrolysis; Desulfovibrio sp.  
  Abstract The production of reduced value-added chemicals and fuels using microorganisms as cheap cathodic electrocatalysts is recently attracting considerable attention. A robust and sustainable production is, however, still greatly hampered by a poor understanding of electron transfer mechanisms to microorganisms and the lack of strategies to improve and manipulate thereof. Here, we investigated the use of electrically-conductive magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles to improve the electrocatalytic activity of a H-2-producing Desulfovibrio paquesii biocathode. Microbial biocathodes supplemented with a suspension of nanoparticles displayed increased H-2 production rates and enhanced stability compared to unamended ones. Cyclic voltammetry confirmed that Faradaic currents involved in microbially-catalyzed H-2 evolution were enhanced by the addition of the nanoparticles. Possibly, nanoparticles improve the extracellular electron path to the microorganisms by creating composite networks comprising of mineral particles and microbial cells. Copyright (C) 2014, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
  Address [Gacitua, Manuel A.; Gonzalez, Bernardo] Univ Adolfo Ibanez, Ctr Appl Ecol & Sustainabil CAPES, Lab Bioingn, Fac Ingn & Ciencias, Santiago 7941169, Chile, Email: mgacitua.pdc@uai.cl;  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0360-3199 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000341897500004 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 414  
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Author Gacitua, M.A.; Munoz, E.; Gonzalez, B. pdf  doi
openurl 
  Title Bioelectrochemical sulphate reduction on batch reactors: Effect of inoculum-type and applied potential on sulphate consumption and pH Type
  Year 2018 Publication Bioelectrochemistry Abbreviated Journal Bioelectrochemistry  
  Volume 119 Issue Pages 26-32  
  Keywords Biocathode potential control; Bioelectrochemical sulphate reduction; Desulfobacter halotolerans; Sulphate reducing bacterial consortium  
  Abstract Microbial electrolysis batch reactor systems were studied employing different conditions, paying attention on the effect that biocathode potential has on pH and system performance, with the overall aim to distinguish sulphate reduction from H-2 evolution. Inocula from pure strains (Desulfovibrio paquesii and Desulfobacter halotolerans) were compared to a natural source conditioned inoculum. The natural inoculum possess the potential for sulphate reduction on serum bottles experiments due to the activity of mutualistic bacteria (Sedimentibacter sp. and Bacteroides sp.) that assist sulphate-reducing bacterial cells (Desulfovibrio sp.) present in the consortium. Electrochemical batch reactors were monitored at two different potentials (graphite-bar cathodes poised at -900 and -400mV versus standard hydrogen electrode) in an attempt to isolate bioelectrochemical sulphate reduction from hydrogen evolution. At -900mV all inocula were able to reduce sulphate with the consortium demonstrating superior performance (SO42- consumption: 25.71 g m(-2) day(-1)), despite the high alkalinisation of the media. At -400mV only the pure Desulfobacter halotolerans inoculated system was able to reduce sulphate (SO42- consumption: 17.47 g m(-2) day(-1)) and, in this potential condition, pH elevation was less for all systems, confirming direct (or at least preferential) bioelectrochemical reduction of sulphate over H-2 production. (c) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
  Address [Gacitua, Manuel A.; Munoz, Enyelbert; Gonzalez, Bernardo] Univ Adolfo Ibanez, Ctr Appl Ecol & Sustainabil CAPES, Fac Ingn & Ciencias, Lab Bioingn, Santiago, Chile, Email: mgacitua.pdc@uai.cl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Science Sa Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1567-5394 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000418312300004 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 778  
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Author Gazitua, M.C.; Morgante, V.; Poupin, M.J.; Ledger, T.; Rodriguez-Valdecantos, G.; Herrera, C.; Gonzalez-Chavez, M.D.; Ginocchio, R.; Gonzalez, B. doi  openurl
  Title The microbial community from the early-plant colonizer (Baccharis linearis) is required for plant establishment on copper mine tailings Type
  Year 2021 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci. Rep.  
  Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 10448  
  Keywords BACTERIAL COMMUNITIES; HEAVY-METALS; PHYTOSTABILIZATION; REVEGETATION; RHIZOSPHERE; REMEDIATION; IMPACT; GROWTH; NORTH  
  Abstract Plants must deal with harsh environmental conditions when colonizing abandoned copper mine tailings. We hypothesized that the presence of a native microbial community can improve the colonization of the pioneer plant, Baccharis linearis, in soils from copper mining tailings. Plant growth and microbial community compositions and dynamics were determined in cultivation pots containing material from two abandoned copper mining tailings (Huana and Tambillos) and compared with pots containing fresh tailings or surrounding agricultural soil. Controls without plants or using irradiated microbe-free substrates, were also performed. Results indicated that bacteria (Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes groups) and fungi (Glomus genus) are associated with B. linearis and may support plant acclimation, since growth parameters decreased in both irradiated (transiently without microbial community) and fresh tailing substrates (with a significantly different microbial community). Consistently, the composition of the bacterial community from abandoned copper mining tailings was more impacted by plant establishment than by differences in the physicochemical properties of the substrates. Bacteria located at B. linearis rhizoplane were clearly the most distinct bacterial community compared with those of fresh tailings, surrounding soil and non-rhizosphere abandoned tailings substrates. Beta diversity analyses showed that the rhizoplane bacterial community changed mainly through species replacement (turnover) than species loss (nestedness). In contrast, location/geographical conditions were more relevant than interaction with the plants, to explain fungal community differences.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000658433400011 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ alexi.delcanto @ Serial 1425  
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Author Gazitua, M.C.; Slater, A.W.; Melo, F.; Gonzalez, B. pdf  doi
openurl 
  Title Novel alpha-ketoglutarate dioxygenase tfdA-related genes are found in soil DNA after exposure to phenoxyalkanoic herbicides Type
  Year 2010 Publication Environmental Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Environ. Microbiol.  
  Volume 12 Issue 9 Pages 2411-2425  
  Keywords  
  Abstract P>Phenoxyalkanoic herbicides such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D), 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyrate (2,4-DB) or mecoprop are widely used to control broad-leaf weeds. Several bacteria have been reported to degrade these herbicides using the alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate dioxygenase encoded by the tfdA gene, as the enzyme catalysing the first step in the catabolic pathway. The effects of exposure to different phenoxyalkanoic herbicides in the soil bacterial community and in the tfdA genes diversity were assessed using an agricultural soil exposed to these anthropogenic compounds. Total community bacterial DNA was analysed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism of the 16S rRNA and the tfdA gene markers, and detection and cloning of tfdA gene related sequences, using PCR primer pairs. After up to 4 months of herbicide exposure, significant changes in the bacterial community structure were detected in soil microcosms treated with mecoprop, 2,4-DB and a mixture of both plus 2,4-D. An impressive variety of novel tfdA gene related sequences were found in these soil microcosms, which cluster in new tfdA gene related sequence groups, unequally abundant depending on the specific herbicide used in soil treatment. Structural analysis of the putative protein products showed small but significant amino acid differences. These tfdA gene sequence variants are, probably, required for degradation of natural substrate(s) structurally related to these herbicides and their presence explains self-remediation of soils exposed to phenoxyalkanoic herbicides.  
  Address [Gazitua, M. C.; Slater, A. W.; Melo, F.; Gonzalez, B.] Pontificia Univ Catolica Chile, Fac Ciencias Biol, Dept Mol Genet & Microbiol, Ctr Adv Studies Ecol & Biodivers, Santiago, Chile, Email: bernardo.gonzalez@uai.cl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1462-2912 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000281556900003 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 97  
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Author Goldstein-Daruech, N.; Cope, E.K.; Zhao, K.Q.; Vukovic, K.; Kofonow, J.M.; Doghramji, L.; Gonzalez, B.; Chiu, A.G.; Kennedy, D.W.; Palmer, J.N.; Leid, J.G.; Kreindler, J.L.; Cohen, N.A. pdf  doi
openurl 
  Title Tobacco Smoke Mediated Induction of Sinonasal Microbial Biofilms Type
  Year 2011 Publication Plos One Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages 7 pp  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Cigarette smokers and those exposed to second hand smoke are more susceptible to life threatening infection than nonsmokers. While much is known about the devastating effect tobacco exposure has on the human body, less is known about the effect of tobacco smoke on the commensal and commonly found pathogenic bacteria of the human respiratory tract, or human respiratory tract microbiome. Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a common medical complaint, affecting 16% of the US population with an estimated aggregated cost of $6 billion annually. Epidemiologic studies demonstrate a correlation between tobacco smoke exposure and rhinosinusitis. Although a common cause of CRS has not been defined, bacterial presence within the nasal and paranasal sinuses is assumed to be contributory. Here we demonstrate that repetitive tobacco smoke exposure induces biofilm formation in a diverse set of bacteria isolated from the sinonasal cavities of patients with CRS. Additionally, bacteria isolated from patients with tobacco smoke exposure demonstrate robust in vitro biofilm formation when challenged with tobacco smoke compared to those isolated from smoke naive patients. Lastly, bacteria from smoke exposed patients can revert to a non-biofilm phenotype when grown in the absence of tobacco smoke. These observations support the hypothesis that tobacco exposure induces sinonasal biofilm formation, thereby contributing to the conversion of a transient and medically treatable infection to a persistent and therapeutically recalcitrant condition.  
  Address [Goldstein-Daruech, Natalia; Zhao, Ke-Qing; Kofonow, Jennifer M.; Doghramji, Laurel; Chiu, Alexander G.; Kennedy, David W.; Palmer, James N.; Cohen, Noam A.] Univ Penn, Dept Otorhinolaryngol Head & Neck Surg, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA, Email: cohenn@uphs.upenn.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Public Library Science Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000286511900008 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 117  
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Author Hengst, M.B.; Andrade, S.; Gonzalez, B.; Correa, J.A. pdf  doi
openurl 
  Title Changes in Epiphytic Bacterial Communities of Intertidal Seaweeds Modulated by Host, Temporality, and Copper Enrichment Type
  Year 2010 Publication Microbial Ecology Abbreviated Journal Microb. Ecol.  
  Volume 60 Issue 2 Pages 282-290  
  Keywords  
  Abstract This study reports on the factors involved in regulating the composition and structure of bacterial communities epiphytic on intertidal macroalgae, exploring their temporal variability and the role of copper pollution. Culture-independent, molecular approaches were chosen for this purpose and three host species were used as models: the ephemeral Ulva spp. (Chlorophyceae) and Scytosiphon lomentaria (Phaeophyceae) and the long-living Lessonia nigrescens (Phaeophyceae). The algae were collected from two coastal areas in Northern Chile, where the main contrast was the concentration of copper in the seawater column resulting from copper-mine waste disposals. We found a clear and strong effect in the structure of the bacterial communities associated with the algal species serving as host. The structure of the bacterial communities also varied through time. The effect of copper on the structure of the epiphytic bacterial communities was significant in Ulva spp., but not on L. nigrescens. The use of 16S rRNA gene library analysis to compare bacterial communities in Ulva revealed that they were composed of five phyla and six classes, with approximately 35 bacterial species, dominated by members of Bacteroidetes (Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides) and alpha-Proteobacteria, in both non-polluted and polluted sites. Less common groups, such as the Verrucomicrobiae, were exclusively found in polluted sites. This work shows that the structure of bacterial communities epiphytic on macroalgae is hierarchically determined by algal species > temporal changes > copper levels.  
  Address [Hengst, Martha B.] Univ Antofagasta, Antofagasta Inst Renewable Resources, Antofagasta, Chile, Email: bernardo.gonzalez@uai.cl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0095-3628 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000281981300003 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 98  
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Author Heuer, H.; Binh, C.T.T.; Jechalke, S.; Kopmann, C.; Zimmerling, U.; Krogerrecklenfort, E.; Ledger, T.; Gonzalez, B.; Top, E.; Smalla, K. pdf  doi
openurl 
  Title IncP-1 epsilon plasmids are important vectors of antibiotic resistance genes in agricultural systems: diversification driven by class 1 integron gene cassettes Type
  Year 2012 Publication Frontiers In Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Front. Microbiol.  
  Volume 3 Issue Pages 8 pp  
  Keywords IncP-1 epsilon plasmid; exogenous isolation; complete sequence; gene cassette; qPCR; arable soil; pig manure  
  Abstract The role of broad-host range IncP-1 epsilon plasmids in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance in agricultural systems has not yet been investigated. These plasmids were detected in total DNA from all of 16 manure samples and in arable soil based on a novel 5'-nuclease assay for real-time PCR. A correlation between IncP-1 epsilon plasmid abundance and antibiotic usage was revealed. In a soil microcosm experiment the abundance of IncP-1 epsilon plasmids was significantly increased even 127 days after application of manure containing the antibiotic compound sulfadiazine, compared to soil receiving only manure, only sulfadiazine, or water. Fifty IncP-1 epsilon plasmids that were captured in E. coli CV601gfp from bacterial communities of manure and arable soil were characterized by PCR and hybridization. All plasmids carried class 1 integrons with highly varying sizes of the gene cassette region and the sul1 gene. Three IncP-1 epsilon plasmids captured from soil bacteria and one from manure were completely sequenced. The backbones were nearly identical to that of the previously described IncP-1 epsilon plasmid pKJK5. The plasmids differed mainly in the composition of a Tn402-like transposon carrying a class 1 integron with varying gene cassettes, IS 1326, and in three of the plasmids the tetracycline resistance transposon In 1721 with various truncations. Diverse Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria were revealed as hosts of one of the IncP-1 epsilon plasmids in soil microcosms. Our data suggest that IncP-1 epsilon plasmids are important vectors for horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance in agricultural systems.  
  Address [Heuer, Holger; Binh, Chu T. T.; Jechalke, Sven; Kopmann, Christoph; Zimmerling, Ute; Kroegerrecklenfort, Ellen; Smalla, Kornelia] Julius Kuhn Inst, Inst Epidemiol & Pathogen Diagnost, Fed Res Ctr Cultivated Plants, D-38104 Braunschweig, Germany, Email: kornelia.smalla@jki.bund.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1664-302x ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000208863600056 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 467  
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Author Kraiser, T.; Gras, D.E.; Gutierrez, A.G.; Gonzalez, B.; Gutierrez, R.A. pdf  doi
openurl 
  Title A holistic view of nitrogen acquisition in plants Type
  Year 2011 Publication Journal Of Experimental Botany Abbreviated Journal J. Exp. Bot.  
  Volume 62 Issue 4 Pages 1455-1466  
  Keywords Bacteria; nitrogen; nitrogen acquisition; plants  
  Abstract Nitrogen (N) is the mineral nutrient required in the greatest amount and its availability is a major factor limiting growth and development of plants. As sessile organisms, plants have evolved different strategies to adapt to changes in the availability and distribution of N in soils. These strategies include mechanisms that act at different levels of biological organization from the molecular to the ecosystem level. At the molecular level, plants can adjust their capacity to acquire different forms of N in a range of concentrations by modulating the expression and function of genes in different N uptake systems. Modulation of plant growth and development, most notably changes in the root system architecture, can also greatly impact plant N acquisition in the soil. At the organism and ecosystem levels, plants establish associations with diverse microorganisms to ensure adequate nutrition and N supply. These different adaptive mechanisms have been traditionally discussed separately in the literature. To understand plant N nutrition in the environment, an integrated view of all pathways contributing to plant N acquisition is required. Towards this goal, in this review the different mechanisms that plants utilize to maintain an adequate N supply are summarized and integrated.  
  Address [Kraiser, Tatiana; Gras, Diana E.; Gutierrez, Rodrigo A.] Pontificia Univ Catolica Chile, Dept Mol Genet & Microbiol, Ctr Genome Regulat, Santiago 8331010, Chile, Email: rgutierrez@bio.puc.cl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Univ Press Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0957 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000286989700010 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 124  
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