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Author (up) Calvo, R.; Alamos, N.; Huneeus, N.; O'Ryan, R. doi  openurl
  Title Energy poverty effects on policy-based PM2.5 emissions mitigation in southern and central Chile Type
  Year 2022 Publication Energy Policy Abbreviated Journal Energy Policy  
  Volume 161 Issue Pages 112762  
  Keywords Energy poverty; Firewood consumption; Particulate matter; Thermal retrofit; Stove replacement  
  Abstract Residential firewood burning is the main source of PM2.5 emissions in southern and central Chile. In Chile, approximately 4000 premature deaths are observed each year due to air pollution. Mitigation policies aim to reduce dwellings' energy demand and foster cleaner but more expensive energy sources. Pre-existing energy poverty conditions are often overlooked in these policies, even though they can negatively affect the adoption of these measures. This article uses southern and central Chile as a case study to assess quantitatively different policy scenarios of PM2.5 emissions between 2017 and 2050, considering energy poverty-related effects. Results show that PM2.5 emissions will grow 16% over time under a business as usual scenario. If thermal improvement and stove/heater replacements are implemented, PM2.5 reductions depend on the scale of the policy: a 5%-6% reduction of total southern and central Chile PM2.5 emissions if only cities with Atmospheric Decontamination Plans are included; a 54%-56% reduction of PM2.5 emissions if these policies include other growing cities. Our study shows that the energy poverty effect potentially reduces the effectiveness of these measures in 25%. Consequently, if no anticipatory measures are taken, Chile's energy transition goals could be hindered and the effectiveness of mitigation policies to improve air quality significantly reduced.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0301-4215 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000736971100008 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ alexi.delcanto @ Serial 1520  
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Author (up) Gallardo, L.; Barraza, F.; Ceballos, A.; Galleguillos, M.; Huneeus, N.; Lambert, F.; Ibarra, C.; Munizaga, M.; O'Ryan, R.; Osses, M.; Tolvett, S.; Urquiza, A.; Veliz, K.D. pdf  doi
openurl 
  Title Evolution of air quality in Santiago: The role of mobility and lessons from the science-policy interface Type
  Year 2018 Publication Elementa-Science Of The Anthropocene Abbreviated Journal Elementa-Sci. Anthrop.  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages 23 pp  
  Keywords Air quality; mobility; urbanization; climate mitigation; policy-science interface; Chile  
  Abstract Worldwide, urbanization constitutes a major and growing driver of global change and a distinctive feature of the Anthropocene. Thus, urban development paths present opportunities for technological and societal transformations towards energy efficiency and decarbonization, with benefits for both greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollution mitigation. This requires a better understanding of the intertwined dynamics of urban energy and land use, emissions, demographics, governance, and societal and biophysical processes. In this study, we address several characteristics of urbanization in Santiago (33.5 degrees S, 70.5 degrees W, 500 m a.s.l.), the capital city of Chile. Specifically, we focus on the multiple links between mobility and air quality, describe the evolution of these two aspects over the past 30 years, and review the role scientific knowledge has played in policy-making. We show evidence of how technological measures (e.g., fuel quality, three-way catalytic converters, diesel particle filters) have been successful in decreasing coarse mode aerosol (PM10) concentrations in Santiago despite increasing urbanization (e.g., population, motorization, urban sprawl). However, we also show that such measures will likely be insufficient if behavioral changes do not achieve an increase in the use of public transportation. Our investigation seeks to inform urban development in the Anthropocene, and our results may be useful for other developing countries, particularly in Latin America and the Caribbean where more than 80% of the population is urban.  
  Address [Gallardo, Laura; Barraza, Francisco; Ceballos, Andres; Galleguillos, Mauricio; Huneeus, Nicolas; Lambert, Fabrice; Ibarra, Cecilia; Munizaga, Marcela; O'Ryan, Raul; Osses, Mauricio; Tolvett, Sebastian; Urquiza, Anahi; Veliz, Karina D.] Ctr Climate & Resilience Res CR2, FONDAP15110009, Santiago, Region Metropol, Chile, Email: lgallard@u.uchile.cl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Univ California Press Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2325-1026 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000431309200001 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 850  
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