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Author Clavero-Leon, C.; Ruiz, D.; Cillero, J.; Orlando, J.; Gonzalez, B. doi  openurl
  Title The multi metal-resistant bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 affects growth and metal mobilization in Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to copper Type
  Year 2021 Publication PeerJ Abbreviated Journal PeerJ  
  Volume 9 Issue Pages e11373  
  Keywords SOIL; PHYTOEXTRACTION; COLONIZATION; ACCUMULATION; BIOSORPTION; HOMEOSTASIS; MICROBES; CADMIUM; SYSTEMS; EXCESS  
  Abstract Copper (Cu) is important for plant growth, but high concentrations can lead to detrimental effects such as primary root length inhibition, vegetative tissue chlorosis, and even plant death. The interaction between plant-soil microbiota and roots can potentially affect metal mobility and availability, and, therefore, overall plant metal concentration. Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 is a multi metal-resistant bacterial model that alters metal mobility and bioavailability through ion pumping, metal complexation, and reduction processes. The interactions between strain CH34 and plants may affect the growth, metal uptake, and translocation of Arabidopsis thaliana plants that are exposed to or not exposed to Cu. In this study, we looked also at the specific gene expression changes in C. metallidurans when co-cultured with Cu-exposed A. thaliana. We found that A. thaliana's rosette area, primary and secondary root growth, and dry weight were affected by strain CH34, and that beneficial or detrimental effects depended on Cu concentration. An increase in some plant growth parameters was observed at copper concentrations lower than 50 mM and significant detrimental effects were found at concentrations higher than 50 mM Cu. We also observed up to a 90% increase and 60% decrease in metal accumulation and mobilization in inoculated A. thaliana. In turn, copper-stressed A. thaliana altered C. metallidurans colonization, and cop genes that encoded copper resistance in strain CH34 were induced by the combination of A. thaliana and Cu. These results reveal the complexity of the plant-bacteria-metal triad and will contribute to our understanding of their applications in plant growth promotion, protection, and phytoremediation strategies.  
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  ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000651763400003 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ alexi.delcanto @ Serial 1392  
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Author Marin, O.; Gonzalez, B; Poupin, M.J. doi  openurl
  Title From Microbial Dynamics to Functionality in the Rhizosphere: A Systematic Review of the Opportunities With Synthetic Microbial Communities Type
  Year 2021 Publication Frontiers In Plant Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Plant Sci.  
  Volume 12 Issue Pages 650609  
  Keywords BACTERIAL COMMUNITYARABIDOPSIS-THALIANAROOT MICROBIOMEPLANTGROWTHCOLONIZATIONDIVERSITYDISEASE  
  Abstract Synthetic microbial communities (SynComs) are a useful tool for a more realistic understanding of the outcomes of multiple biotic interactions where microbes, plants, and the environment are players in time and space of a multidimensional and complex system. Toward a more in-depth overview of the knowledge that has been achieved using SynComs in the rhizosphere, a systematic review of the literature on SynComs was performed to identify the overall rationale, design criteria, experimental procedures, and outcomes of in vitro or in planta tests using this strategy. After an extensive bibliography search and a specific selection process, a total of 30 articles were chosen for further analysis, grouping them by their reported SynCom size. The reported SynComs were constituted with a highly variable number of members, ranging from 3 to 190 strains, with a total of 1,393 bacterial isolates, where the three most represented phyla were Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Only four articles did not reference experiments with SynCom on plants, as they considered only microbial in vitro studies, whereas the others chose different plant models and plant-growth systems; some of them are described and reviewed in this article. Besides, a discussion on different approaches (bottom-up and top-down) to study the microbiome role in the rhizosphere is provided, highlighting how SynComs are an effective system to connect and fill some knowledge gaps and to have a better understanding of the mechanisms governing these multiple interactions. Although the SynCom approach is already helpful and has a promising future, more systematic and standardized studies are needed to harness its full potential.  
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  ISSN 1664-462X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000662311000001 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ alexi.delcanto @ Serial 1422  
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Author Rodriguez-Valdecantos, G.; Manzano, M.; Sanchez, R.; Urbina, F.; Hengst, M.B.; Lardies, M.A.; Ruz, G.A.; Gonzalez, B. pdf  doi
openurl 
  Title Early successional patterns of bacterial communities in soil microcosms reveal changes in bacterial community composition and network architecture, depending on the successional condition Type
  Year 2017 Publication Applied Soil Ecology Abbreviated Journal Appl. Soil Ecol.  
  Volume 120 Issue Pages 44-54  
  Keywords 2,4-D Herbicide; Bacterial successional dynamics; Cycloheximide; Environmental perturbations; Soil colonization; Soil microcosms  
  Abstract Soil ecosystem dynamics are influenced by the composition of bacterial communities and environmental conditions. A common approach to study bacterial successional dynamics is to survey the trajectories and patterns that follow bacterial community assemblages; however early successional stages have received little attention. To elucidate how soil type and chemical amendments influence both the trajectories that follow early compositional changes and the architecture of the community bacterial networks in soil bacterial succession, a time series experiment of soil microcosm experiments was performed. Soil bacterial communities were initially perturbed by dilution and subsequently subjected to three amendments: application of the pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, as a pesticide-amended succession; application of cycloheximide, an inhibitor affecting primarily eukaryotic microorganisms, as a eukaryotic-inhibition bacterial succession; or application of sterile water as a non-perturbed control. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of the 16S rRNA gene isolated from soil microcosms was used to generate bacterial relative abundance datasets. Bray-Curtis similarity and beta diversity partition-based methods were applied to identify the trajectories that follow changes in bacterial community composition. Results demonstrated that bacterial communities exposed to these three conditions rapidly differentiated from the starting point (less than 12 h), followed different compositional change trajectories depending on the treatment, and quickly converged to a state similar to the initial community (48-72 h). Network inference analysis was applied using a generalized Lotka-Volterra model to provide an overview of bacterial OTU interactions and to follow the changes in bacterial community networks. This analysis revealed that antagonistic interactions increased when eukaryotes were inhibited, whereas cooperative interactions increased under pesticide influence. Moreover, central OTUs from soil bacterial community networks were also persistent OTUs, thus confirming the existence of a core bacterial community and that these same OTUs could plastically interact according to the perturbation type to quickly stabilize bacterial communities undergoing succession.  
  Address [Rodriguez-Valdecantos, Gustavo; Sanchez, Raimundo; Urbina, Felipe; Antonio Lardies, Marco; Ruz, Gonzalo A.; Gonzalez, Bernardo] Univ Adolfo Ibanez, Fac Ingn & Ciencias, Santiago 7941169, Chile, Email: bernardo.gonzalez@uai.cl  
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  Publisher Elsevier Science Bv Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0929-1393 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes WOS:000411866600006 Approved  
  Call Number UAI @ eduardo.moreno @ Serial 797  
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