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Author Balocchi, F.; Galleguillos, M.; Rivera, D.; Stehr, A.; Arumi, J.L.; Pizarro, R.; Garcia-Chevesich, P.; Iroume, A .; Armesto, J.J.; Herve-Fernandez, P.; Oyarzun, C.; Barria, P.; Little, C.; Mancilla, G.; Yepez, S.; Rodriguez, R.; White, D.A.; Silberstein, R.P.; Neary, D.G.; de Arellano, P.R.
Title Forest hydrology in Chile: Past, present, and future Type
Year 2023 Publication Journal of Hydrology Abbreviated Journal J. Hydrol.
Volume 616 Issue Pages 128681
Keywords Exotic plantations; Chilean native forests; Sediment yield; Water yield; Land use planning
Abstract This paper reviews the current knowledge of hydrological processes in Chilean temperate forests which extend along western South America from latitude 29 degrees S to 56 degrees S. This geographic region includes a diverse range of natural and planted forests and a broad sweep of vegetation, edaphic, topographic, geologic, and climatic set-tings which create a unique natural laboratory. Many local communities, endangered freshwater ecosystems, and downstream economic activities in Chile rely on water flows from forested catchments. This review aims to (i) provide a comprehensive overview of Chilean forest hydrology, to (ii) review prior research in forest hydrology in Chile, and to (iii) identify knowledge gaps and provide a vision for future research on forest hydrology in Chile. We reviewed the relation between native forests, commercial plantations, and other land uses on water yield and water quality from the plot to the catchment scale. Much of the global understanding of forests and their relationship with the water cycle is in line with the findings of the studies reviewed here. Streamflow from forested catchments increases after timber harvesting, native forests appear to use less water than plantations, and streams draining native forest yield less sediment than streams draining plantations or grassland/shrublands. We identified 20 key knowledge gaps such as forest groundwater systems, soil-plant-atmosphere interactions, native forest hydrology, and the effect of forest management and restoration on hydrology. Also, we found a paucity of research in the northern geographic areas and forest types (35-36 degrees S); most forest hydrology studies in Chile (56%) have been conducted in the southern area (Los Rios Region around 39-40 degrees S). There is limited knowledge of the geology and soils in many forested areas and how surface and groundwater are affected by changes in land cover. There is an opportunity to advance our understanding using process-based investigations linking field studies and modeling. Through the establishment of a forest hydrology science “society” to coor-dinate efforts, regional and national-scale land use planning might be supported. Our review ends with a vision to advance a cross-scale collaborative effort to use new nation-wide catchment-scale networks Long-term Ecosystem Research (LTER) sites, to promote common and
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-1694 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes WOS:000899251700004 Approved
Call Number UAI @ alexi.delcanto @ Serial 1717
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Author Beya-Marshall, V.; Arcos, E.; Seguel, O.; Galleguillos, M.; Kremer, C.
Title Optimal irrigation management for avocado (cv. 'Hass') trees by monitoring soil water content and plant water status Type
Year 2022 Publication Agricultural Water Management Abbreviated Journal Agric. Water Manag.
Volume 271 Issue Pages 107794
Keywords Water productivity; Stem water potential; Baseline; Frequency domain reflectometry; Irrigation scheduling; Yield; Water scarcity
Abstract Irrigation scheduling based on soil water content (Ow) sensors requires that Ow be maintained within a range (management lines) that is optimal for plant growth. The lower limit or “breaking point ” is determined following the soil water content dynamics on the transition of a rapid rate of depletion to a slower, under similar reference evapotranspiration. Although this criterion is practical, its implementation should be validated with plant water status measurement that contemplate weather condition, such as stem water potential “non-stressed ” baseline (Tx as a function of vapor-pressure deficit (VPD) in Ow conditions that do not limit yield). A study was con-ducted on a mature cv. 'Hass' avocado orchard in Central Chile during two seasons. There were 5 irrigation treatments: T1, Control; T2 and T3 with 29% less and 25% more of what was applied in T1, respectively; T4 and T5 same as Control until first and second fruit drop abscission, respectively, and then with 29% less. T1 trees were irrigated using a continuous frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) probe to maintain the root zone be-tween field capacity and the breaking point. There was biweekly monitoring of the Ow prior to irrigation, Tx and VPD. The Tx decline proportional to the intensity and the timing of water restriction; however, no treatment affected the crop load in either season. T2 did not show significant detrimental in fruit size, production and maturation, despite that frequently reached water content levels at the limit of the breaking point, and showed lower levels of stem water potential than Control, being the treatment with the highest water productivity. The results confirm that breaking point is an effective criterion to establish irrigation management. Additionally, when comparing the baseline for our non-stressed trees with a baseline from full irrigation treatments obtained from the literature, 30% water savings were achieved.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0378-3774 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes WOS:000831063900003 Approved
Call Number UAI @ alexi.delcanto @ Serial 1615
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Author Hobson, M.J.; Trifonov, T.; Henning, T.; Jordan, A.; Rojas, F.; Espinoza, N.; Brahm, R.; Eberhardt, J.; Jones, M.I.; Mekarnia, D.; Kossakowski, D.; Schlecker, M.; Pinto, M.T.; Miranda, P.J.T.; Abe, L.; Barkaoui, K.; Bendjoya, P.; Bouchy, F.; Buttu, M.; Carleo, I.; Collins, K.A.; Colon, K.D.; Crouzet, N.; Dragomir, D.; Dransfield, G.; Gasparetto, T.; Goeke, R.F.; Guillot, T.; Guenther, M.N.; Howard, S.; Jenkins, J.M.; Korth, J.; Latham, D.W.; Lendl, M.; Lissauer, J.J.; Mann, C.R.; Mireles, I.; Ricker, G.R.; Saesen, S.; Schwarz, R.P.; Seager, S.; Sefako, R.; Shporer, A.; Stockdale, C.; Suarez, O.; Tan, T.G.; Triaud, A.H.M.J.; Ulmer-Moll, S.; Vanderspek, R.; Winn, J.N.; Wohler, B.; Zhou, G.R.
Title Alert Results TOI-199 b: A Well-characterized 100 day Transiting Warm Giant Planet with TTVs Seen from Antarctica 41 of 41 TOI-199 b: A Well-characterized 100 day Transiting Warm Giant Planet with TTVs Seen from Antarctica Type
Year 2023 Publication Astronomical Journal Abbreviated Journal Astron. J.
Volume 166 Issue 5 Pages 201
Keywords MAGNETIC ACTIVITY; ERROR-CORRECTION; EXOPLANET YIELD; I-ARCHITECTURE; ASTEP 400; MODEL; TELESCOPE; SYSTEMS; JUPITER; CODE
Abstract We present the spectroscopic confirmation and precise mass measurement of the warm giant planet TOI-199 b. This planet was first identified in TESS photometry and confirmed using ground-based photometry from ASTEP in Antarctica including a full 6.5 hr long transit, PEST, Hazelwood, and LCO; space photometry from NEOSSat; and radial velocities (RVs) from FEROS, HARPS, CORALIE, and CHIRON. Orbiting a late G-type star, TOI-199 b has a 104.854-0.002+0.001day period, a mass of 0.17 +/- 0.02 M J, and a radius of 0.810 +/- 0.005 R J. It is the first warm exo-Saturn with a precisely determined mass and radius. The TESS and ASTEP transits show strong transit timing variations (TTVs), pointing to the existence of a second planet in the system. The joint analysis of the RVs and TTVs provides a unique solution for the nontransiting companion TOI-199 c, which has a period of 273.69-0.22+0.26days and an estimated mass of 0.28-0.01+0.02MJ . This period places it within the conservative habitable zone.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0004-6256 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes WOS:001098090800001 Approved
Call Number UAI @ alexi.delcanto @ Serial 1933
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Author Ortega, V.; Donoso-Bravo, A.; Chamy-Maggy, R.; Campos, J.L.; Mosquera-Corral, A.; Belmonte, M.
Title Factors That Affect Methane Yield Using Raw Olive Alperujo (Unhydrolyzed) as Substrate in BMP Assays Type
Year 2022 Publication Recycling Abbreviated Journal Recycling
Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 15
Keywords BMP assays; factorial experimental design; Gompertz model; methane yield; olive alperujo
Abstract The olive alperujo (OA) corresponds to the solid waste generated in the olive oil extraction process using the two-phase centrifugation method. OA is produced in large quantities (800 kg OA/ton olives processed) and is characterized by its high moisture content, organic matter, and low pH. In Chile, the olive oil industry is recent, and one of its main challenges is to be able to manage OA to reduce the impact caused by its disposal. In this sense, its valorization as biogas by means of anaerobic digestion is an economically attractive option. For this, it is previously necessary to evaluate the biomethane potential (BMP) of the raw OA using batch assays. This study was focused on evaluating the factors that most affect the methane yield (MY) when using OA as substrate in BMP tests. First, a sweep analysis (Plackett-Burman) was applied to determine those factors that, according to the literature, would have an influence on the BMP tests. Among the factors studied, the most significant were preincubation, OA concentration, and agitation level. Subsequently, a 2(3) factorial experimental design was applied to evaluate the effect of these factors on MY at different levels. Results show that the OA concentration was the most significant factor affecting MY.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2313-4321 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes WOS:000787957300001 Approved
Call Number UAI @ alexi.delcanto @ Serial 1575
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